Baby blocks

quilt

I made this baby quilt some time ago and this is how I remember making it.

I think the height of the diamond was 3″. I made a template out of the clear plastic usually used for quilt templates. Included the seam allowances. Cut it out using either craft scissors, craft knife and ruler, or rotary cutter and ruler. Used the point of an old compass  and a well padded surface underneath to punch a hole at the exact intersection of each seam in each corner of the diamond. Filed the back side of the hole with sandpaper or a nail file to make it smooth.

Cut the fabric in 3 inch strips and used the ruler, rotary cutter and gridded mat underneath to guide the cuttings at the correct angle. Used ultra-fine permanent marker or pencil to mark the point of seam intersection on fabric through the hole in the clear plastic.

Sewed by machine using the side of the presser foot for guidance. Commenced each seam by sewing toward the marked point from several stitches away, lifted the presser foot and swung the diamond around to sew back again over those few stitches and continued on the end of the seam, ending at the point.

Sewed three pieces together of dark, medium and light to make hexagonal shapes. The center join can be fanned out with a finger and it will show a 6 point star! Press it open gently. Decided on the arrangement of the shapes. Marked each shape with a label to show row and number in row labeling from left to right. Made a master chart of the rows and numbers.

Sewed the rows together, gently pressed, and decided on the background fabric for the border. Appliqued the finished top to the background fabric. Cut away the part that won’t show, or leave in place. Used cotton needle punched batting and chose an interesting backing. Hand quilted in the ditch. Applied double binding.

The diamond shape is very versatile in quiltmaking and I enjoy using it.  I just saw a beautiful arrangement of the diamond segments at Norma’s https://shesewsyouknow.wordpress.com/2016/01/14/some-quilts-in-progress/ and I look forward to playing with the baby blocks again.

A very affordable book (if you don’t mind used books) you might like is “Quilts of Illusion” by Laura Fisher. I paid $10 for my 1988 used paperback edition years ago, but today on a quick check of amazon I’m finding copies for less than that. I’ve spent many happy hours puzzling over the pictures of antique American quilts; getting ideas for quilts I’ve made and would like to make; reading the text and descriptions that accompany each photo, but mainly just gazing at the beautiful designs and imagining the fun it must have been to put one together.

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Baby blocks

  1. I like your version very much.
    You use a very different method to mine: I put every piece on to stiff paper and oversew by hand to the next piece.I can’t imagine I’d be accurate enough to use your method.

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    • Yes, the paper pieced method would be very accurate and for applique pieces as well. With the machine method, the side of the presser foot is 1/4″, the same size as the seam allowance so it goes very quickly. You just need to stop right at or one stitch before the marked dot to get a perfect join. I think it’s called a Y seam. I do like the portability of hand work and have pieced some units by hand. I love the layout and color choices for your quilt.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have heard of the y seam but I’ve never tried it. I do sew quilts by machine but doubt I’m accurate enough even with my 1/4″ foot.
        Thanks for your kind comments on my quilt

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  2. A very affordable book (if you don’t mind used books) you might like is “Quilts of Illusion” by Laura Fisher. I paid $10 for my 1988 used paperback edition years ago, but today on a quick check of amazon I’m finding copies for less than that. I’ve spent many happy hours puzzling over the pictures of antique American quilts; getting ideas for quilts I’ve made and would like to make; reading the text and descriptions that accompany each photo, but mainly just gazing at the beautiful designs and imagining the fun it must have been to put one together.

    Like

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