Kimono style blouses 1915-1928

img

The kimono or Magyar style blouse has sleeves cut in one with the bodice. Some have long sleeves and some short. Some have two patterns, the front and the back, joined along both the top of the shoulder seam and the side seam/underarm seam. Others are cut in one piece so there is no seam along the shoulder line. The blouse is held together by a long side/underarm seam on either side.

Long sleeve styles will pose a challenge to cut unless the fabric is wide enough for the length of the sleeve. A possible solution might be found in the 1915 illustration above where longer flared sleeves with decorative bands are attached to the basic short sleeve kimono bodice.

Three blouses from 1915, all may be kimono style. The shoulder bands on the right and left models could conceal shoulder gathers. The neckline on the center model may have been cut out into a low square and material added to fill up the neckline.

img

An ad from 1922 showing the sleeve lengthening technique on the top left model. Various trimmings, bodice insertions, and banding at the low waist add personality to the kimono shape.

img

 

From 1928 London, an elegant afternoon dress in two materials.

img

Also from 1928 a breezy afternoon dress with matching short sleeved kimono jacket. This style might be cut in one piece.

img

In my next post I will discuss an interesting college textbook from 1917 that goes in depth about the challenges of drafting and draping the kimono style. I’ve also found a few illustrations of this ageless style that date between 1930-1950. Many thanks to EmilyAnn for her kimono draping presentation at https://retroglam.wordpress.com/

One thought on “Kimono style blouses 1915-1928

  1. You’re most welcome, Carol. This style runs from simple to complex. What I will say is that the comfort level is determined by the angle the sleeve takes at the top. My short kimono sleeve runs 5″ beyond the shoulder line. This gives the sleeve a very sloping appearance. It does restrict movement, though. I will cover this more in-depth when I make a full toile and do more fitting with it. I can move my arm freely up to the point where I raise my arms up slightly. When I put my arms straight up, the whole blouse will move up out of the skirt!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s